1114 21st Street (between L & K streets)
Sacramento, CA 95811 // USA
Phone: 916-447-5696
Email: info@timetestedbooks.net


Store Hours:
11am - 7pm Monday-Saturday
11am - 3pm Sunday
(We're usually open late for 2nd Saturday)


Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Thursday, October 25: Andy Furillo reading/signing 'The First Year'

Time Tested Books
is proud to present
Andy Furillo
reading / signing / Q&A
The First Year
Thursday, October 25th, 7:00pm
It's the dawn of the age of Trump, and renowned Sacramento wood sculptor Lincoln Adams is trying to understand what happened. An investigation takes him into the middle of a Russian organized crime operation that helped steal the 2016 election. When the Russians offer Link a way out, he takes the path of most resistance....
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Andy Furillo grew up in Downey, CA, and graduated from UC Santa Barbara. He is married, lives in Davis, and is the father of a grown son. He worked in the newspaper business for forty-four years, starting in his hometown at the Southeast News, and eventually spent twenty-six years at the Sacramento Bee, where he won several national awards for his reporting.
  In 2016 Furillo wrote a book about his father, sportscaster and columnist Bud Furillo, called The Steamer: Bud Furillo and the Golden Age of L.A. Sports (Santa Monica Press). Furillo left the newspaper business in 2017 to work in communications, which is also when he began writing fiction. The First Year is his first novel.

This event is FREE & all are welcome

Monday, October 8, 2018

Wednesday, November 28 - Ryan Stoa on 'Craft Weed: Family Farming and the Future of the Marijuana Industry'

Time Tested Books
is pleased to present
Ryan Stoa
reading / discussion / Q&A
Craft Weed:
Family Farming and the
Future of the Marijuana Industry
Wednesday, November 28th, 7:00pm


How the future of post-legalization marijuana farming can be sustainable, local, and artisanal.
 
What will the marijuana industry look like as legalization spreads? Will corporations sweep in and create "Big Marijuana," flooding the market with mass-produced weed? Or will marijuana agriculture stay true to its roots in family farming, and reflect a sustainable, local, and artisanal ethic? In Craft Weed, Ryan Stoa argues that the future of the marijuana industry should be powered by small farms—that its model should be more craft beer than Anheuser-Busch.

     To make his case for craft weed, Stoa interviews veteran and novice marijuana growers, politicians, activists, and investors. He provides a history of marijuana farming and its post-hippie resurgence in the United States. He reports on the amazing adaptability of the cannabis plant and its genetic gifts, the legalization movement, regulatory efforts, the tradeoffs of indoor versus outdoor farms, and the environmental impacts of marijuana agriculture. To protect and promote small farmers and their communities, Stoa proposes a Marijuana Appellation system, modeled after the wine industry, which would provide a certified designation of origin to local crops. A sustainable, local, and artisanal farming model is not an inevitable future for the marijuana industry, but Craft Weed makes clear that marijuana legalization has the potential to revitalize rural communities and the American family farm.

     As the era of marijuana prohibition comes to an end, now is the time to think about what kind of marijuana industry and marijuana agriculture we want. Craft Weed will help us plan for a future that is almost here.


"Most books about the modern marijuana industry are often torn between celebrating legalization's seeming inevitability and sharpening fears about its potential effects. Ryan Stoa's Craft Weed offers something new: a smart, historically accurate, and valuable middle ground that advocates for the benefits of small-scale 'craft' cannabis farming as a means of rebuilding America's agricultural heritage and preventing the rise of marijuana monopolies. By tracing the history of how cannabis has long been produced in the United States, Stoa argues against misguided fears of 'Big Marijuana' and gives actionable, useful advice for the benefits of developing a local, sustainable industry. Well-written and thoroughly researched, Craft Weed is a must-read for anyone who wants the best for this emerging industry's future."
--Emily Dufton, author of Grass Roots: The Rise and Fall and Rise of Marijuana in America


Ryan Stoa is Associate Professor of Law at Concordia University School of Law in Boise, Idaho.


This event is FREE & all are welcome

Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Jane McAlevey on 'No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Gilded Age' - October 9th

Time Tested Books
is pleased to present
Jane McAlevey
forum / discussion / Q&A
No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Gilded Age
Tuesday, October 9th, 7:00pm


Forum with organizer, author, and scholar Jane McAlevey. Jane is the author of No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Gilded Age (Oxford University Press, 2016).

Join Sacramento DSA for a wide-ranging discussion on how we can organize for power and win in the Trump era.
 
Jane F. McAlevey is a Post Doctoral Fellow in the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School. A longtime organizer in the environmental and labor movements, she is the author of Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell): My Decade Fighting for the Labor Movement (Verso, 2014).

"McAlevey's decades as a labor and community organizer means that she knows what organizers do, or should do. This book lifts the lessons McAlevey takes from that craft into the intellectual realm of power and politics. This book is for anyone who wants a democratic society in which ordinary people share power." --Frances Fox Piven, author of Challenging Authority: How Ordinary People Change America

"Jane McAlevey is a deeply experienced, uncommonly reflective organizer. In No Shortcuts, McAlevey stresses the distinction between mobilizing and organizing and examines how systematic conflation of the two has reflected and reinforced the labor movement's decline over recent decades. More than a how-to manual for organizers, No Shortcuts is a serious, grounded rumination on building working-class power. It is a must read for everyone concerned with social justice in the US." --Adolph Reed, Jr., Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania

"Jane McAlevey is one of the few analysts of social movements today who takes class power and class struggle seriously. McAlevey understands their ineluctable concreteness and force from years of organizing democratic unions that have effectively battled powerful corporations. This is a book for citizens and activists--but also for students and scholars of social movements--who want to understand how the world can and has been changed for the better." --Jeff Goodwin, Professor of Sociology, New York University

"Whether it is Black Lives Matter, climate change, feeling the Bern, or worker rights, success hinges on the ability to build real and sustainable power. Jane McAlevey gives us both a practical guide and a set of underlying principles to understand how organizing matters more than any other available strategy to grow power, and, what it means to organize. A must read for anyone hoping to create a better world." --Dan Clawson, Professor of Sociology, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

"For those of us grappling with the near-overwhelming difficulties of the 'how-to' of changing our workplaces, communities, and society, No Shortcuts is an invaluable resource." -- Jacobin
"The heart of No Shortcuts is composed of four case studies that show how those unions still committed to organizing have managed to do it. Some of this, like her treatment of the Chicago Teachers Union, will be familiar, but there is much that is new. For instance, her account of the heroic United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) campaign to organize a sprawling Smithfield Foods pork plant in the small town of Tar Heel, North Carolina a story that went largely unreported because of a gag order imposed on the union uncovers one of the most inspiring episodes in recent labor history." --New Labor Forum
"No Shortcuts outlines some of the reasons for the decline of trade union power in recent decades, but crucially it also offers solutions. This is undoubtedly one of the best books written in recent years on trade unions and should be considered required reading for anyone with an interest in tackling the decline of the labour movement." --Ruairi Creaney, Freelance Lefty

 This event is FREE & all are welcome

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

J. Scott Coatsworth reading/signing 'The River City Chronicles' - October 4th

Time Tested Books
is pleased to present
J Scott Coatsworth
reading / signing
The River City Chronicles
Thursday, October 4th, 7:00pm

A group of strangers meets at Ragazzi, an Italian restaurant, for a cooking lesson that will change them all. They quickly become intertwined in each other's lives, and a bit of magic touches each of them.

Meet Dave, the consultant who lost his partner; Matteo and Diego, the couple who run the restaurant; recently-widowed Carmelina; Marcos, a web designer getting too old for hook-ups; Ben, a trans author writing the Great American Novel; teenager Marissa, kicked out for being bi; and Sam and Brad, a May-September couple who would never have gotten together without a little magic of their own.

Everyone in the River City has a secret, and sooner or later secrets always come out.

This event is FREE & all are welcome

Monday, July 16, 2018

Mary Mackey: 'The Jaguars that Prowl Our Dreams: New and Selected Poems 1974-2018' - September 13th


Time Tested Books
is proud to present
Mary Mackey (and guests*)
reading / signing / Q&A
The Jaguars That Prowl Our Dreams:
New and Selected Poems 1974-2018
Thursday, September 13th, 7:00pm


*Added: special guests Josh McKinney & Trina Drotar

In The Jaguars That Prowl Our Dreams, Mary Mackey writes of life, death, love, and passion with intensity and grace. Her poems are hugely imaginative and multi-layered. Part One contains forty-eight new poems including twenty-one set in Western Kentucky from 1742 to 1975; and twenty-six unified by an exploration of the tropical jungle outside and within us, plus a surreal and sometimes hallucinatory appreciation of the visionary power of fever. Part Two offers the reader seventy-eight poems drawn from Mackey’s seven previous collections including Sugar Zone, winner of the 2012 Oakland PEN Award for Literary Excellence.

“It is difficult to resist the temptation to compare Mary Mackey to Elizabeth Bishop. Both poets are stunningly imagistic, musical, and awake to topography, sociology, and the world beyond.” —The Huffington Post

Mary Mackey's poems are powerful, beautiful, and have extraordinary range. This is the poetry of a woman who has lived richly, and felt deeply. May her concern for the planet help save it.” —Maxine Hong Kingston

Always Mackey's eye is drawn to the marginalized, the poor, the outcast, the trivialized.  [In] The Jaguars That Prowl Our Dreams, she has created an oeuvre, wilder, more open to change with each passing year. Hers is a monumental achievement.” —D. Nurkse

“Mackey’s crisp-edged perceptions are set down with a sensuous, compassionate, and utterly unflinching eye.” —Jane Hirshfield

Mary Mackey is the author of eight collections of poetry including Sugar Zone, winner of the 2012 PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Award for Literary Excellence and finalist for the Northern California Book Reviewers Award. Mackey’s poems have been praised by Wendell Berry, Jane Hirshfield, Dennis Nurkse, Maxine Hong Kingston, Ron Hansen, Dennis Schmitz, and Marge Piercy for their beauty, precision, originality, and extraordinary range. Her poetry has been featured four times on The Writer’s Almanac. She is also the author of 14 novels, including a New York Times bestseller.

This event is FREE & all are welcome

Peter Gough presents 'Sounds of the New Deal: The Federal Music Project in the West' - August 30th


Time Tested Books
is proud to present
Peter Gough
reading / signing / Q&A
Sounds of the New Deal:
The Federal Music Project in the West
Thursday, August 30th, 7:00pm
 

How the music of the people--all people--triumphed and reshaped America
At its peak the Federal Music Project (FMP) employed nearly 16,000 people who reached millions of Americans through performances, composing, teaching, and folksong collection and transcription. In Sounds of the New Deal, Peter Gough explores how the FMP's activities in the West shaped a new national appreciation for the diversity of American musical expression.
From the onset, administrators and artists debated whether to represent highbrow, popular, or folk music in FMP activities. Though the administration privileged using "good" music to educate the public, in the West local preferences regularly trumped national priorities and allowed diverse vernacular musics to be heard. African American and Hispanic music found unprecedented popularity while the cultural mosaic illuminated by American folksong exemplified the spirit of the Popular Front movement. These new musical expressions combined the radical sensibilities of an invigorated Left with nationalistic impulses. At the same time, they blended traditional patriotic themes with an awareness of the country's varied ethnic musical heritage and vast--but endangered--store of grassroots music.

Rich with anecdotal detail, Sounds of the New Deal reveals the crossroads of art and politics that still shapes America's sense of itself.

"Reading Gough's book has given me an understanding of that extraordinary decade during which the music of the United States was discovered (much as the Europeans 'discovered' North America). Just as important, I have learned what my parents were doing at that time, for they never told us, literally, what their roles were in the projects."--Peggy Seeger, from the foreword

“Those interested in the culture of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal will find Gough’s book instructive. Recommended.”--Choice

"In Sounds of the New Deal, historian Peter Gough helps to address a research gap long unwarranted. Gough's monograph is concise but rich in detail. Accessible and at points enlivened with some of the insider drama of personnel and personality, the book will resonate with interdisciplinary readers and specialists. It is fine work on a worthy topic."--Western American Literature


"For any student of the Great Depression--particularly the new deal--this tome will be a welcome source, reflecting a unique and rich time for American music."--The Journal of Arizona History

"Peter Gough's Sounds of the New Deal significantly adds to the cultural history of the 1930s. . . . Gough's important contribution not only explores the FMP in the West, based on a wide variety of primary and secondary sources, but also includes coverage of numerous musical styles. . . . It is a pleasure to review such an informative study of popular music."--The Journal of American History

"Peter Gough's book traces the origins and development of the Federal Muse Project (FMP), one of the least studied of the New Deal's cultural agencies. . . . The sources are impressive. Gough has scoured relevant published secondary literature, dissertations and theses, WPA administrative records, local records, sound recordings, and oral histories. . . . The result is a portrait of the activities of thousands of local FMP participants in the American West."--Western Historical Quarterly

"Gough has produced an informative, useful, and notable work that sheds new light on the New Deal and the little-known FMP. He deserves praise for his efforts."--Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society

"The author's passion for the music of the era and belief in the FMP's successful support for the diverse local music styles of the West is evident throughout the book."--Pacific Northwest Quarterly

"The confluence of musical and historical scholarship in Sounds of the New Deal is in many ways exemplary. . . . Each chapter of this book allows the reader to confront music as historical material in ways both common and uncommon. Gough writes about folk song when many would consider it anachronistic; he reinstates the past in the present, embracing the politics of populism with its positive and negative attributes; he turns to a moment of history when singing and listening to diversity made Americans more alike than different."--H-Music

"This book changes the lens on the New Deal music programs. By taking a long view (1935–43) and a regional focus (eight western states), Gough shows these projects to be more politically left, more culturally diverse, more subject to the influence of women, and more productive of performance treasures than previously suspected."--Christine Bold, author of The Frontier Club

"Sounds of the New Deal is not only an important contribution to the cultural history of the Great Depression, but it promises to transform the way in which historians connect culture with politics when studying the era. Gough's keen attention to intra-agency politics, regional differences, cross-cultural interactions, workplace issues for musicians, and, perhaps most importantly, the role of audiences in all of this gives us a better understanding of just how important federal programs were in shaping and creating the demand for culture in the American West during one of the region's most significant periods of growth. A fantastic book."--Peter La Chapelle, author of Proud to Be an Okie: Cultural Politics, Country Music, and Migration to Southern California

"Sounds of the New Deal sings a new song, revealing the significance of the almost unknown Federal Music Program for the first time. Passionately argued and deeply researched, this book permanently changes our understanding of the greatest cultural movement in American history."--Charles McGovern, author of Sold American: Consumption, and Citizenship, 1890-1945

Peter Gough is a lecturer in history at California State University, Sacramento.



This event is FREE
and everyone is invited.